Lazy roads

The title of this post seems weird. It definitely does now that I read it again. But it makes complete sense to me after being back to my hometown Nagpur after a grueling internship at Bangalore. I always fantasized about living in a big city, enjoying the fast pace of life, enjoying reading multiple newspapers every day and being in the midst of all the action. I got to partially live my fantasy for the previous two months in Bangalore and those months have made me grateful for not being obsessed with my reality and for being blessed with a reality called Nagpur and the beautiful life that I lead here. 

In Bangalore, a journey from point A to B with an average speed of more than 30 km/hr is a success story. In Nagpur, you can reach any part of the city in 10 minutes, with the speedometer surprising you with readings of 50-60 km/hr easily. Bangalore introduced me to amazingly frustrating traffic jams, while coming back to Nagpur reminded me of the joy of driving on empty roads. As I get ready to start my professional career in less than a year, the thought of shifting to a metropolis to do quality work bothers me a lot. I have grown accustomed to the lazy roads in my city, the lazy roads that let you speed up, that let you wander without having to know where you are headed, the roads that give you the luxury of getting lost and not losing anything at all. Ideally, I would never leave these roads.. 

But then, when I think of it, these lazy roads seem to be leading nowhere. I look again, the roads lead home. 

Moi and MAD!

This was published in the Hitavada, Nagpur’s supplement called ‘Insight’ today. I am so happy and proud of the current MAD team in Nagpur which consists of Nachiket Deshpande, Harshil Gupta, Saurabh Bajaj, Bhagyashree Barahate, Ankita Poddar and Pranay Patil. What a great team, fellas! Love the energy.Just want to spread the word about MAD through my blog! 🙂