When mush takes over the brain..

When mush takes over the brain,
You know it’s time for the rains,
Suddenly you find your motivation going down the drain,
and the romantic in you is at the helm, with the reigns
A cup of hot steaming coffee,
As you watch the rains lash and pour,
Your favorite books kept close,
As the wind slams open the doors
A frantic rush to the verandah,
To gather all the clothes,
Smiling at the half wet you,
After a glance at the mirror you cannot control
And then the child inside beckons,
Wanting to run out and splash around,
Not a care in the world,
Just wanting to go wild like the clouds
And then the phone rings,
A dear friend’s voice crackling through,
Bringing that knowing smile on your face,
Something only a true friend can do
The longest conversation in the world,
A marathon reading session, not missing a single word,
Endless cups of coffee,
And after many many a sigh,
You realize it’s stopped raining,
A dream, again, perhaps, another day.
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Lazy roads

The title of this post seems weird. It definitely does now that I read it again. But it makes complete sense to me after being back to my hometown Nagpur after a grueling internship at Bangalore. I always fantasized about living in a big city, enjoying the fast pace of life, enjoying reading multiple newspapers every day and being in the midst of all the action. I got to partially live my fantasy for the previous two months in Bangalore and those months have made me grateful for not being obsessed with my reality and for being blessed with a reality called Nagpur and the beautiful life that I lead here. 

In Bangalore, a journey from point A to B with an average speed of more than 30 km/hr is a success story. In Nagpur, you can reach any part of the city in 10 minutes, with the speedometer surprising you with readings of 50-60 km/hr easily. Bangalore introduced me to amazingly frustrating traffic jams, while coming back to Nagpur reminded me of the joy of driving on empty roads. As I get ready to start my professional career in less than a year, the thought of shifting to a metropolis to do quality work bothers me a lot. I have grown accustomed to the lazy roads in my city, the lazy roads that let you speed up, that let you wander without having to know where you are headed, the roads that give you the luxury of getting lost and not losing anything at all. Ideally, I would never leave these roads.. 

But then, when I think of it, these lazy roads seem to be leading nowhere. I look again, the roads lead home.